Respiratory data science - accurate data for successful diagnosis and quality care

Methods' Analytics' Simon Swift in conversation with Julian Flowers, Public Health England

29 May 2015 10:30

The impact of accurate data on early diagnosis and quality care of long-term respiratory health conditions

Simon Swift, Managing Director of Methods Analytics and Julian Flowers from Public Health England discuss what makes 'good data' and why we may still have some way to go to achieve consistent, accurate and high quality analytical tools.

Julian is a Consultant in Public Health and Director of the Eastern Knowledge and Intelligence Team in Public Health England. He led the development of PHE's Longer Lives tool and is interested in the public health potential of primary care and primary data for reducing premature mortality, and in telling stories with data.

Julian has worked in commissioning, clinical effectiveness and health technology assessment and in the dim and distant past was a hospital general physician with and interest in GI and respiratory disease. Prior to joining PHE, Julian was director of the Eastern Public Health Observatory, and Quality Intelligence East, the quality observatory in the East of England.

Simon is Managing Director of Methods Analytics. He worked as a trainee surgeon in the NHS for 8 years before retraining in Health Economics and Health Policy. He has since focused on the use of information in healthcare to improve the quality and value of outcomes, and created the East Midlands Quality Observatory before moving the team to Methods Analytics in 2013.

Simon leads the business, and supports tool development and consulting projects with a thorough understanding of the NHS data and information landscape and clinical practice with an approach that is driven by developing meaningful intelligence to enable understanding, debate and change.

Julian Flowers

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Julian is a Consultant in Public Health and Director of the Eastern Knowledge and Intelligence Team in Public Health England. He led the development of PHE’s Longer Lives tool and is interested in the public health potential of primary care and primary data, in reducing premature mortality, and in telling stories with data. Prior to joining PHE, Julian was director of the Eastern Public Health Observatory, and Quality Intelligence east, the quality observatory in the East of England. Julian has worked in commissioning , clinical effectiveness and health technology assessment and in the dim and distant past was a hospital general physician with an interest in GI and respiratory disease.